Where have the golden arches gone? Has anti-branding paid off?

McDonald’s released its ‘Create Your Taste’ menu with obvious anti-branding – how very un McDonald’s. Anti-branding is a marketing concept whereby a brand will “play dress up” to attract consumer’s who are not necessarily attracted to the brand.  In this instance, McDonald’s can be seen to be jumping on the bandwagon of the burger craze – think Grill’d and the like.  There is however considerable risk with anti-branding.  Continue reading

Does Advertising Need To Be Relatable To Be Effective?

By now, I’m surprised if you haven’t seen this post by Bugaboo or the social commentary surrounding it.  Long story short, a proportion of mothers can be seen to be vocalising how unrealistic it is for a mother to be running in a bikini with a figure such as Ymre Stiekema, pictured.   Continue reading

Creating a fostering environment…

When a consumer enters a store, they entre a new environment. This can be a calming or highly stimulating environment. They may entre with ambition to make a particular purchase, or idly wonder and browse; we have all been in both these positions at one time or another. A stores environment is intrinsically associated with their brand and it is therefore essential to create the right atmosphere and ambience to create a welcoming environment to foster sales; the essential purpose of a store.

Many factors contribute to a store environment including: the music played, the layout of inventory, the use of technology and personality of employees to name a few. Any changes in these elements will influence the store environment, and consequently the brand. Visitors need time to adjust to the store environment upon entry and don’t want to be bombarded by store personnel or stock. These experiences can make a consumer feel very uncomfortable within the space of the store. Store personnel are required to read visitors to the store to assess if they want assistance, are idle shoppers or are on a mission. The wrong classification of any of these visitors to a store can create the wrong ambience. A store that has the right environment will encourage repeat purchasers and sales.   Continue reading

Why aren’t you open when I’m available?

With most families having two working parents, with people having more commitments, with people having less time, with people working longer hours …Why aren’t serviced based businesses open outside of business hours to accommodate for the working population?

What I’m talking about here is services-based businesses, who rely on people physically contacting them in all or certain instances should be open from 11am-7pm or 12 noon – 8pm to allow those who work 9-5 to be able to access them. Services such as Australia Post, banking and hairdressers could be considered among other services whereby such operations hours would be of public benefit. Such business model would be more profitable as staff would be paid to attend to clients rather than being paid to work during the quieter times of the day when their target audience are working.

Not only should these businesses alter their operating hours to accommodate their consumer, they need to increase their level of customer service. When service is what you offer, it is vital you make it a priority. I understand quality of service is rehashing an old issue however businesses need to realise the consumer doesn’t care as much about their brand as they think they do. Consumers are more likely to switch banks than ever before. We are not 100% loyal. The only things keeping someone with their bank can possibly be customer service, innovation or interest rates. I highly doubt it is the last one as the majority of consumers don’t watch these or change banks on this basis. Even Australia Post is facing competition with eBay partnering with Big W and Woolworths distribution networks.

It’s about time businesses changed to reflect changes in society and what society wants. The consumer drives the demand for products and services. We have seen a shift away from in store sales to online sales for products and its time services revolutionised to maintain demand.   Unfortunately, if they continue the way they are going, they won’t keep going.

The IKEA Effect…

ikea_assembly_fail_shelf_aotw

In my last blog post, I mentioned Adam Ferrier talking at the Southstart conference. Adam discussed the psychology behind changing behavior through advertising. A majority of advertising is focused on changing behavior, we either want someone to do something (such as buy a certain product) or stop doing something (such as stop smoking). The theory behind changing behavior through advertising comes from the psychological theory of cognitive dissonance, whereby individuals experience mental stress or discomfort when their thoughts, feelings and behaviors do not align. Therefore, for brands to change behavior we need all three aspects to change so the consumer feels comfortable with their decision. Therefore to change behavior, we also have to change the thoughts and feelings.

The IKEA effect illustrates the consumer’s cognitive bias, and hence changing feelings, towards a brand when they have an input into the creation. Continue reading

Sydney Law Firm – Unethical or Innovative?

From Facebook

From Facebook

It is stating the obvious to say social media has been on the rise in recent times however, still not all brands are utilizing social media efficiently. This week, Mashable reported on LY Lawyers exploring Facebook advertising to target first-time drug offenders who have been charged at music events. Numerous sites have reported on this advertising behavior including Sydney Morning Herald, vice.com and Weekend Sunrise regarding the ethical nature of this advertising. The advertisement in question depicted a person cutting lines of white powder and reads: ‘Busted with possession or supply of drugs at Field Day? Call Sydney’s best drug lawyers!’, featured as a sponsored post on Facebook.
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